Terpene and steroids biosynthesis

Restek's searchable chromatogram library is a comprehensive database of hundreds of chromatograms from applications by Restek chemists, our partners, and customers. Our unique library allows you to search for a chromatogram by compound name, synonym, CAS #, compound class, Restek or competitor column name, catalog number, or keyword. You can add more search terms to refine your results, or use the links in the sidebar of the library to quickly narrow your result set. If you have any questions regarding any of the applications shown here, please feel free to contact Restek's Technical Service Group .

Another study in Egypt involved 204 patients ranging from 12 to 68 years of age with schiostomiasis. Twenty healthy subjects were also followed as controls. The infected patients were divided into 1 of 2 groups: those with schistosomal colitis or those with compensated or decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. All patients and controls received a formulation of myrrh at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 3 consecutive days on a empty stomach 1 hour before breakfast. After 2 months, patients who still had evidence of ova received another course of myrrh for 6 days. The overall cure rate was 91% for all infected patients. The cure rates for patients with schistosomal colitis, compensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, and decompensated hepatosplenic schistosomiasis were 90%, 94%, and 90%, respectively. For 12 patients who had never received treatment with praziquantel, the cure rate associated with myrrh was 100%. Patients with liver dysfunction experienced a lower cure rate, but it was not statistically significant. This may be partially explained by more adequate absorption and metabolism in patients with normal hepatic function. All 4 patients with S. hematobium infections experienced a 100% cure rate. Those with S. mansoni had a 91% cure rate. Adverse reactions were reported by 12% of patients. The most common adverse reactions were giddiness, somnolence, mild fatigue, and abdominal pain. 20

Constituents
- Studies have isolated gallic acid, quercetin, triacontane, cetyl alcohol, phytosterol, phytosterolin (phytosterol glucoside); jambulol, melissic, and a mixture of acids consisting chiefly of palmitic, oleic, and linoleic acid.
- Phytochemicals screenings have yielded alkaloids, essential oil, phenols, sterol, flavones and fatty acids.
- Yields flavonoids: euphorbianin, leucocyanidol, camphol, quercitrin and quercitrol.
- Study has suggested that some of the constituents of the plant are similar to those of the jambul (Syzygium cumini) seeds.
- Dried leaves yielded a moisture content of %, protein % ±, fat % ±, ash % ±, crude fiber % ±, and carbohydrate % ±. Vitamin content showed ascorbic acid mg/100g, thiamine , riboflavin , and niacin . ( 37 )
- Phytochemical screening of extracts yielded the presence of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins resins, steroids, acidic compounds, tannins, glycosides, phenols and terpenoids. (see study below) ( 45 )
- Study of aerial parts (leaves and stems) revealed saponin, sterol, terpene, alkaloids, polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids and especially mucllage. Physiochemical study yielded a moisture content of % ± %, total ash % ± %, sulfuric ash % ± %, hydrochloric acid insoluble ash of % ± %. Mineral analysis yielded magnesium, potassium, calcium, zinc, and traces of chrome. ( 55 )

Toxicity concerns
• In Himachal Pradesh, L. camara variety aculeata (red flower variety) has been responsible for livestock poisoning.
• Most of the livestock poisoning occur on grazing after prolonged stall feeding and during fodder scarcity or draught periods.
• Toxicity: Toxic chemical constituents are toxic terpenoids: lantadene A, B, C and D, and icterogenin. Lantadene A,B and C constitute nearly 69% of total terpenoids. Triterpenoids are most rapidly absorbed from the small intestine, but slow absorption from and stasis in the rumen causes slow and continuous exposure of the liver that lasts for days.
• Ingestion of lantana foliage causes decreased luminal motility that may progress to ruminal atony and cause constipation and impaction as the animals become anorectic and unable to defecate.
• Sometimes, the afflicted animals present with photosensitization with swollen ears and eyelids.
• Ingestion of Berries by Children / No Significant Toxicity: Study reviewed the California Poison Control System database on 641 reported pediatric cases of ingestion of L. camara berries from 1997-2008. Reported effects were vomiting, abdominal pain, agitation, diarrhea, buccal irritation, tachycardia, drowsiness, nausea and mydriasis. No significant effects and no deaths were recorded. Report concludes the ingestion of L. camara (including unripe berries) was not associated with significant toxicity. The ingestion of unripe berries did not exhibit more frequent or more severe symptoms than ingestion of ripe berries or other plant parts. Children with asymptomatic ingestions or mild symptoms can be treated at home. ( 32 )
* Accidental Poisoning of Ostriches that Fed on L. camara Hay : Letter reports an unusual case of poisoning from ingestion of L. camara by a flock of 14-month old ostriches. The report cautions farmers to prevent the encroachment of the plant onto pasture land where grass is cut and collected for purpose of making hay. ( 41 )

Availability
Wild-crafted.  

Terpene and steroids biosynthesis

terpene and steroids biosynthesis

Toxicity concerns
• In Himachal Pradesh, L. camara variety aculeata (red flower variety) has been responsible for livestock poisoning.
• Most of the livestock poisoning occur on grazing after prolonged stall feeding and during fodder scarcity or draught periods.
• Toxicity: Toxic chemical constituents are toxic terpenoids: lantadene A, B, C and D, and icterogenin. Lantadene A,B and C constitute nearly 69% of total terpenoids. Triterpenoids are most rapidly absorbed from the small intestine, but slow absorption from and stasis in the rumen causes slow and continuous exposure of the liver that lasts for days.
• Ingestion of lantana foliage causes decreased luminal motility that may progress to ruminal atony and cause constipation and impaction as the animals become anorectic and unable to defecate.
• Sometimes, the afflicted animals present with photosensitization with swollen ears and eyelids.
• Ingestion of Berries by Children / No Significant Toxicity: Study reviewed the California Poison Control System database on 641 reported pediatric cases of ingestion of L. camara berries from 1997-2008. Reported effects were vomiting, abdominal pain, agitation, diarrhea, buccal irritation, tachycardia, drowsiness, nausea and mydriasis. No significant effects and no deaths were recorded. Report concludes the ingestion of L. camara (including unripe berries) was not associated with significant toxicity. The ingestion of unripe berries did not exhibit more frequent or more severe symptoms than ingestion of ripe berries or other plant parts. Children with asymptomatic ingestions or mild symptoms can be treated at home. ( 32 )
* Accidental Poisoning of Ostriches that Fed on L. camara Hay : Letter reports an unusual case of poisoning from ingestion of L. camara by a flock of 14-month old ostriches. The report cautions farmers to prevent the encroachment of the plant onto pasture land where grass is cut and collected for purpose of making hay. ( 41 )

Availability
Wild-crafted.  

Media:

terpene and steroids biosynthesisterpene and steroids biosynthesisterpene and steroids biosynthesisterpene and steroids biosynthesisterpene and steroids biosynthesis

http://buy-steroids.org